UPCOMING CONCERTS

Concert Series Sponsored By:

 

ROOTSFEST 2013


Rootsfest: Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express

Friday, August 23, 2013
Forde Nursery
2025 2nd Avenue Northwest
Great Falls, MT 59404
406-727-0950
Gates open at 5; music at 6 pm
Tickets $25 advance at Forde Nursery or Wines by Wednesday until 1 pm day of show, or $30 at the gate

 

Chuck Prophet shapes his restless career with inimitable subtle flair: a vivid parade of razor-edged one-liners camouflaged in a slack-jawed drawl, songs about heartbreak and everyman heroism, drenched in twisted lines of rude Telecaster.

When the early stages of a financial melt-down coincided with a rare San Francisco heat wave in the summer of 2008, with the window open wide and Dwight Twilley, Iggy, Thin Lizzy and the Knack blaring out the hi-fi, Prophet wrote a collection of political songs for non-political people. Later, in April 2009, he journeyed to Mexico City, where, in the clutches of a Swine Flu panic and earthquakes, he recorded ¡Let Freedom Ring!, his most incendiary record, every bit as urgent as the title demands.

In some parallel dimension Chuck Prophet is a star, though for the real-world fans he’s amassed over the past three decades, beginning with his stint in Green on Red through his well-regarded solo career, he may as well already be one. Certainly Prophet stands as a revered writer’s writer, earning the respect of such peers as Lucinda Williams and Alejandro Escovedo—the latter’s last three records were cowritten with Prophet. One wonders whether Escovedo’s pronounced trips down memory lane partly inspired Prophet’s latest, Temple Beautiful, a tribute to his San Francisco roots that’s populated with figures both familiar and forgotten, from Willie Mays, murdered politician Harvey Milk and legendary stripper Carol Doda to an ode to the colorful characters gathered to watch the annual Castro Street Halloween parades. The music itself combines the provincial street poetry of Lou Reed with roots-riffs and the jangle of power-pop, all propelled with a passion and soul that lifts the project well past its personal scrapbook blueprint. And that’s really the gift of a great storyteller: to make memories public, to make friends out of strangers, to take something specific and transform it into something universal. Or, in the case of the oblique AIDS chronicle “Museum of Broken Hearts,” to turn the tragic, dirty or damaged into something beautiful. - Time Out Chicago

Chuck Prophet’s catalogue is overflowing with insightful character studies, jangle-pop perfection and energetic barroom rockers. And that accounts for just some of the songs he has written, recorded and forgotten. In his 25-plus-year career, the 49-year-old has established himself as a minor god in the roots-rock pantheon — a sharp, prolific singer-songwriter who always seems to have a new batch of tunes ready to go. - Washington Post




Rootsfest: Jeanne Jolly

Friday, August 23, 2013
Forde Nursery
2025 2nd Avenue Northwest
Great Falls, MT 59404
406-727-0950
Gates open at 5; music at 6 pm
Tickets $25 advance at Forde Nursery or Wines by Wednesday until 1 pm day of show, or $30 at the gate

Singer/songwriter Jeanne Jolly broke onto the music scene as the featured vocalist for Grammy Award winning jazz trumpeter Chris Botti. Touring all through North America she had the opportunity to sing with world renowned symphonies and perform at venues like Carnegie Hall and play marquee events such as the Monterey Jazz Festival.

A diverse, classically trained vocalist, Jolly’s voice is said to embody the “early belting power of Linda Ronstadt” (MetroMusicScene, VA) combined “the delicate lilt of Alison Krauss” (NC Metro Magazine). Born in North Carolina, Jolly was the recipient of Western Carolina University’s Young Alumni Award and has earned a Masters in Vocal Performance from New England Conservatory. Upon completing her schooling, Jolly moved to L.A. where her career quickly took off. In addition to working with Botti, she began to explore different styles of music, recording with acclaimed songwriters Lowen & Navarro and country artist Bob Woodruff.

In an age where stardom can be instantaneous, it’s always nice when you are made aware of an artist that has been quietly developing their craft in to something really special. North Carolina native Jeanne Jolly has taken a long and varied road prior to the release of her debut full-length album, “Angels”, having resided in Boston, Los Angeles and of course, North Carolina. The result is a solid, warm and varied album that will satisfy virtually all who are fortunate enough to listen.

There is a little bit of jazz, a little bit of roots rock, and a whole lot of straight ahead country music. The opening track, “Angels of Hayward Street”, seemingly sets an early, dark tone for the album, but Jolly then takes us over to a beautiful love song with the second track “Sweet Love.” A class of lost souls has their story told on “Happy Days Cafe.” One of the best aspects of this album is that it’s tough to categorize, which makes it a perfect Americana record.

Trained in opera, Jolly really demonstrates her incredible diversity on several of the tracks on this album, but none more so than on “Tear Soup”, a story song about trying to get past total and complete heartbreak … to varying degrees of non-success. It takes a special talent to be able to weave in a classic country sound with opera, and Jolly pulls it off in spades. In fact, I would suspect this task has never been attempted before now… Jason Gartshore at Americana Review